Events

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Sandra Ford, Black Panthers, at a demonstration in support of repressed peoples at the U.S. Courthouse on February 14, 1970. Courtesy City of Portland (OR) Archives, A2004-005.2957

Type: Online Video, Panel Discussion     Series: History Pub

Untold Stories of the Civil Rights Movement

Learn about the traditionally untold stories of the Civil Rights Movement, specifically the role of women of color. Speakers will share reflections on their work in the Oregon Civil Rights Movement — their struggles and greatest memories — as well as advice for young activists on how to get involved and what they can do to make a positive difference in their local communities.

  • Free
  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Black activists and journalists regularly emphasized mob violence as a prime motivation for black migration to northern cities. “The Reason,” The Crisis (NAACP newsletter) 19:5 (March 1920): 264

Type: Lecture, Online Video     

Civil Rights and Anti-Black Violence in America and Oregon

Racial violence was particularly significant in the nationalization of civil rights, as evidenced by the creation of the NAACP in the wake of northern migration and the racial violence that ensued in the first decade of the twentieth century. That process of violence, migration, and organization connects places such as Mississippi and Oregon, and telling stories about this violence — whether it occurred in Mississippi or in Marshfield, Oregon — linked Black communities and fueled the rise of a national civil rights movement. Join us for a discussion between historians working in two corners of the country, as they explore the ways violence and storytelling have connected those places to the national movement for equality.

  • Free
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
The Color of Law A forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Fair Housing Act 50th Anniversary

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Recently named by the New York Times as one of the 100 notable books of 2017, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law A forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America is an explosive, alarming history that finally confronts how American governments in the twentieth century deliberately imposed residential racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide. Join us for an evening with the author, who will discuss the findings described in his new book and will hold a post-lecture conversation with Allan Lazo. Presented by the Fair Housing Council of Oregon.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
“Pittmon’s [Residential Security] Map of Portland, Ore. and vicinity, compiled from records on file in the offices of the city and county engineers.”  Copyright and published by Armena Pittmon, 1934, Portland.

Type: Online Video, Panel Discussion     Series: Fair Housing Act 50th Anniversary

Making Home and Community Before and After the Fair Housing Act

African Americans who lived in Portland during the twentieth century built homes and communities that provided connection among family and friends, and space for growth and learning as government policies, realtors’ practices, and beliefs expressed by dominant Whites often restricted where and how Black people could live. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 challenged some of those discriminatory practices. This panel of Black Portlanders, who were all youths during this time period, will offer first-hand reflections on ways their families and neighbors built and sustained the meaning of home and community across the decades of the twentieth centuries, despite the local and national blocks that sought to prevent them from doing so.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Portland Noir

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Portland Noir

From shanghaied sailors to opium dens, Portland’s illicit past is legendary. But how much of it is true?  "Portland Noir" examines Old Town’s sordid history.

Oregon State University an Oregon Experience

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Oregon State University: 150 Years At Oregon's Land-Grant Institution

Since its founding in 1868, Oregon State University's mission has been to be a school for the people of the state, offering research, outreach and instruction to residents in every county. In 2018, Oregon State University celebrates 150 years as a land-grant institution with a mission to serve as a “school for the people of Oregon.”<br /><br />

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Pendleton Round-Up's Pat Owen, 1928

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Pendleton Round-Up: The Wild West Way

The Pendleton Round-Up is not the oldest rodeo in the country and not even close to the biggest. But according to the cowboys who compete there, it’s one of the best. And besides, the Round-Up is far more than just a rodeo. Dedicated volunteers, tribal involvement and thrill-a-minute entertainment have made the Round-Up one of the oldest and most prestigious rodeos in the world. Oregon Experience looks back at the first hundred years of Round-Up!

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Murder On The Southern Pacific

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Murder On The Southern Pacific

“Murder on the Southern Pacific” chronicles Oregon’s most infamous train holdup, and examines the myths and mysteries still associated with the case. On October 11, 1923, three brothers tried to rob a Southern Pacific train as it made its way over the Siskiyou Summit of Southern Oregon. Before it was all over four men would be dead, and three brothers on the run. The incident would be the basis of movies, songs, comic books and even trading cards.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Massacre at Hells Canyon

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Massacre At Hells Canyon

In 1887, a gang of horse thieves gunned down as many as 34 Chinese gold miners on the Oregon side of the Snake River near Hells Canyon. Some have called it the country’s worst massacre of Chinese by whites. Though the killers were known, and at least one confessed, no one was ever convicted.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
James Beard

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

A Cuisine of Our Own

From Razor clam souffle’ to her famous currant teacakes — Mary Beard loved to cook, and always with the freshest seasonal ingredients. Her son James embraced his mother’s passion for food. And even as the proclaimed “dean of American cookery” later moved away and traveled the world, James Beard would forever champion Oregon as a food-lover’s paradise.