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Pendleton Round-Up's Pat Owen, 1928

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Pendleton Round-Up: The Wild West Way

The Pendleton Round-Up is not the oldest rodeo in the country and not even close to the biggest. But according to the cowboys who compete there, it’s one of the best. And besides, the Round-Up is far more than just a rodeo. Dedicated volunteers, tribal involvement and thrill-a-minute entertainment have made the Round-Up one of the oldest and most prestigious rodeos in the world. Oregon Experience looks back at the first hundred years of Round-Up!

  • Family-friendly
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Murder On The Southern Pacific

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Murder On The Southern Pacific

“Murder on the Southern Pacific” chronicles Oregon’s most infamous train holdup, and examines the myths and mysteries still associated with the case. On October 11, 1923, three brothers tried to rob a Southern Pacific train as it made its way over the Siskiyou Summit of Southern Oregon. Before it was all over four men would be dead, and three brothers on the run. The incident would be the basis of movies, songs, comic books and even trading cards.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Massacre at Hells Canyon

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Massacre At Hells Canyon

In 1887, a gang of horse thieves gunned down as many as 34 Chinese gold miners on the Oregon side of the Snake River near Hells Canyon. Some have called it the country’s worst massacre of Chinese by whites. Though the killers were known, and at least one confessed, no one was ever convicted.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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The Braceros

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Braceros

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor during World War II caught all of America off guard, and the rapid transition to a country at war transformed just about every aspect of the American economy. In Oregon, World War II created a skyrocketing demand for agricultural products at the same time that farmers faced a dire agricultural labor shortage. The eventual answer was an international agreement between the United States and Mexico, an arrangement for American farms and railroads to contract with temporary Mexican workers. Officially named the Emergency Farm Labor Supply Program, it ultimately came to be known as the Bracero program.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Sam Hill

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Sam Hill

Sam Hill had great dreams for the Pacific Northwest, and himself. Out of the hardscrabble, do-it-yourself communities of loggers, farmers and ranchers that typified 19th-century Oregon, Hill envisioned a new society built on progress and human ingenuity. He championed grand roadways, built monumental symbols for peace and dared to imagine a farming utopia on the Columbia River. His life was etched with hard fought triumphs and colossal failures, but his enduring devotion to progress made him one of the most important and legendary figures in Oregon’s history.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Luther Cressman, Quest For First People

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Luther Cressman, Quest For First People

Could Oregon caves hold the secrets to how and when people first arrived in the Americas? More than 70 years ago, University of Oregon archaeologist Dr. Luther Cressman believed that was the case. In 1938, Cressman and his students made a groundbreaking discovery that changed archaeology and continues to have profound effects on science today. They uncovered a cache of 10,000-year-old sagebrush sandals. They are the oldest footwear ever discovered. Over the next 30 years, Dr. Luther Cressman would challenge the prevailing ideas about when and how humans first arrived in the Americas.

  • Family-friendly
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Tom McCall

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Tom McCall

Tom McCall, Oregon’s chief executive from 1967 to 1975, may go down in history as the state’s most productive governor. He was certainly the most interesting. Nearly forty years after he left office and thirty years after his death, Oregon Governor Tom McCall remains one of the state’s most renowned political figures. He envisioned a quality of environment and life unique to Oregon, and he worked relentlessly to protect those values.

  • Family-friendly
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Umatilla Indians. Photograph by Andrews; Wesley (Charles Wesley); 1870-1950. bb015161 OrHi 41181

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Broken Treaties

Hundreds of books exist about the Lewis and Clark expedition and the decades of pioneers who followed them West. But even today, most Oregonians don't know much about the people who had settled here centuries before "the settlers" came. "Broken Treaties" introduces viewers to the tribes of our state and explores a thread of the Oregon story that hasn't been told very well over the years.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Opal Whiteley

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Opal Whiteley

In 1920, Oregon’s Opal Whiteley was the center of international controversy. Her childhood diary was called a work of genius, until readers discovered hidden clues to a mystery that has not been solved to this day.

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On the Fourth of July, children rode through town on a violin-shaped float.

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Sagebrush Symphony

The Portland Youth Philharmonic is America's first youth orchestra. But the story of the PYP begins in Burns where a violinist named Mary Dodge shared her love of music with the local children. As their talent emerged, Dodge formed a children's orchestra called the Sagebrush Symphony that captivated audiences statewide.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers