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Okanogan author Christine Quintasket collecting huckleberries. OHS Research Library, bb014523

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

Foreigners in Native Homelands: Lewis and Clark and the Pioneers

Indigenous peoples have lived in the Columbia River Plateau region for thousands of years, negotiating and fostering relationships among themselves and with the ecosystems of their homelands. Beginning in the nineteenth century, they formed relationships with foreigners who arrived overland — first, the Lewis and Clark Expedition and, later, thousands of immigrants on the Oregon Trail. Scholars Bobbie Conner and Bill Lang will discuss with each other and with the audience the experience of newcomers entering and crossing those homelands, including how those events impacted life for Native people and how those foreigners’ experiences in the plateau contrasted with the goals they had set when leaving their homes.

  • Researchers
  • Teachers

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

Women’s Resistance in Early Twentieth Century Oregon

From direct action to court action, women in Oregon used a variety of tactics to protest the state, and the status quo, in the early twentieth century. Women from diverse backgrounds protested as individuals and as members of political and labor organizations, seeking both personal freedom and justice for collective groups. They faced incarceration, harassment, and even physical violence as they worked to demand change. As historian Kimberly Jensen will demonstrate, their stories are important pieces of larger histories of citizenship, civil liberties, and dissent.

  • Researchers
  • Teachers
600 Demonstrators march to protest bombing in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four black children. 09/23/1963, OHS Research Library, Oregon Journal Collection, CN 020486

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

Oregon’s Enigmatic Black History

Black and white Oregonians have sometimes been in conflict and, at other times, have cooperated as they threaded their way through the state’s history. Blacks in Oregon sometimes pioneered laws and societal practices that reflected national events. Although minuscule in numbers, blacks, along with white allies, led the way in enacting racial justice legislation during the mid-twentieth century. Oregon’s Constitution, however, banned both slavery and free blacks — while the state’s political leadership supported the Union during the Civil War, which led to the end of slavery. Join us for an evening exploring Oregon’s enigmatic history in relation to blacks.

  • Teachers
  • Researchers
John Gast, American Progress, 1872. Chromolithograph published by George A, Crofutt. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. digital ID ppmsca.09855

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

Oregon, Indigenous Nations, Manifest Destiny, and the Doctrine of Discovery

The “Doctrine of Discovery” is the international law principle that European nations used to claim most of the non-European world. This talk will explain the elements that make up this law and argue that the Doctrine of Discovery morphed into “American Manifest Destiny” and was used, and is still being used today, to justify the acquisition of lands and assets of Indian Nations and peoples.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Image courtesy of Chelsea Rose, SOULA

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

Beyond Chinatown: Uncovering Oregon’s Rural Chinese History

This talk highlights the recent archaeological work and findings of the Oregon Chinese Diaspora Project (OCDP), a multi-agency partnership that has been excavating sites across the state in order to better understand and share the history of Oregon's early Chinese residents. With a focus on rural communities, remote mining camps, and railroad construction, this collaborative project has provided important insight into the Chinese experience and role in the settlement and development of Oregon.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
“Valley of the Willamette River,” lithograph from Warre, Henry J. Sketches in North America and the Oregon Country. London: Dickinson & Co., 1848. OHS Research Library, OrHi 49030, bb016736

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

Rethinking Oregon Settlement

Please join scholars Dr. Katy Barber and Dr. Melinda Marie Jetté for two presentations that will encourage attendees to consider the complexities surrounding the settlement of Oregon.

  • Teachers
  • Researchers
Kathy as a young girl living on the reservation, just before Termination. Courtesy of Kathleen Hill.

Type: Lecture     Series: Experience Oregon

You’re So Vain: Indian-White Relations in the 21st Century

Klamath tribal citizen Kathleen Hill discusses the relationship between Indigenous people and settler-colonists in North America. While the sovereignty of Native nations is legally recognized, “white” systems of power continue to dominate and intrude into the lives of Native people.

  • Teachers
  • Researchers