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Maxville Loggers: This photograph was taken in Maxville. Photo courtesy of Dorothy Smith

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Logger's Daughter

In 1923, a Missouri lumber company built a town in northeastern Oregon named Maxville. Hundreds of loggers left Arkansas and Mississippi to live and work there. Many brought their families, and many were African Americans. While the town has long since disappeared, the Maxville story is still unfolding. The Logger’s Daughter follows Gwen Trice, an African-American woman who was born and raised in Eastern Oregon, as she sets out to explore her family’s past.

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Lola Baldwin, about 1890. Item Number bb003366 and OrHi 83946.

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Lola G. Baldwin

On April 1, 1908 Lola G. Baldwin was sworn in “to perform police service” for Portland, Oregon and became the nation’s first policewoman. As Superintendent of the new Women’s Protective Division, Detective Baldwin crusaded for the moral and physical welfare of young, single working women. Her goal was to prevent them from being lured into lives of prostitution and crime by offering positive alternatives and by making the city safe.

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Holland, Lloyd Smith Collections

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Capturing Oregon's Frontier

More than 30 years ago photographer Lloyd Smith bought a box of historic glass plate negatives at a garage sale. The box contained hundreds of photographs documenting rural life in Southern Oregon in the early 20th century. The images featured families posed in front of their homes, men and women working at everyday tasks, children at play, and just about all facets of rural life. Today, Smith has a collection of thousands of historic images, most from Southern Oregon dating from 1890 to 1910s.

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long line skinner

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Reub Long’s Oregon Desert

Back in the early ‘60s, Russ Jackman, a retired OSU extension agent, and Reuben Long, a colorful Fort Rock Valley rancher, collaborated to create a book. The result, “The Oregon Desert,” was unique. It successfully blended natural science with cowboy humor and scholarly prose with casual meanderings. It was a celebration of rural Western storytelling, and over the years, it has become a Pacific Northwest classic.

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Oregon Experience: Hanford

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Hanford

In 1943, as World War II raged in Europe and the Pacific, thousands of men and women from across the United States began arriving in a remote part of south-central Washington state. They knew very little about why the U.S. government had hired them — only that it was an important project to support the war effort. It was a project that would change the world forever.

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The Jewish Frontier

Type: Television Broadcast, Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Jewish Frontier


OPB-TV

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Courtesy of the The Wing Luke Museum. 1992.041.004.029

Type: Television Broadcast     Series: Oregon Experience

Oregon’s Japanese Americans


OPB-TV

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Tom McCall

Type: Television Broadcast, Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Tom McCall


OPB-TV

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Cars and bathers on an Oregon beach.  Oregon State Archives

Type: Television Broadcast, Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Beach Bill


OPB-TV

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Woman assembling scope, ca 1950s  Courtesy vintageTEK.org

Type: Television Broadcast, Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Spirit of Tek


OPB-TV

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