Racing to Change: Oregon’s Civil Rights Years

Black United Front leader, Ron Herndon, stands on a desk at a School Board protest against the closure of Harriet Tubman Middle School, March 30, 1982. Steve Nehl, Oregon Journal. OrHi 95005 ba018353

January 15 – June 24, 2018

  • Free for Members
  • Family-friendly
  • Teachers
  • Handicap Accessible Friendly

Location:
Oregon Historical Society
1200 SW Park Ave
Portland, Oregon 97205
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Presented by the Oregon Black Pioneers.

Racing to Change illuminates the Civil Rights Movement in Oregon in the 1960s and 70s, a time of cultural and social upheaval, conflict, and change. The era brought new militant voices into a clash with traditional organizations of power, both Black and white.

Visitors of all ages and backgrounds will be engaged by the examination of the repression and violence against African American that made the Civil Rights Movement necessary. The exhibit examines how racist attitudes, policies of exclusion, and the destruction of Black-owned neighborhoods shaped Oregon, as well as the unceasing efforts of the Black community to overcome these obstacles.

About the Oregon Black Pioneers

The state’s premier Black heritage organization is dedicated to illuminating African Americans’ contributions to Oregon’s history through research, publications, exhibits, and community outreach. The organization's newest exhibition, Racing to Change: Oregon’s Civil Rights Years, directly builds on three highly successful collaborations with the Oregon Historical Society and reflects the all-volunteer organization's increasing capacity to create meaningful opportunities for community dialogue and learning.

Oregon Black Pioneers