Events

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Tom McCall

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Tom McCall

Tom McCall, Oregon’s chief executive from 1967 to 1975, may go down in history as the state’s most productive governor. He was certainly the most interesting. Nearly forty years after he left office and thirty years after his death, Oregon Governor Tom McCall remains one of the state’s most renowned political figures. He envisioned a quality of environment and life unique to Oregon, and he worked relentlessly to protect those values.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Lake view of the original Elizabethan theatre Photographer: Dwaine E. Smith. Courtesy of Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The origins and the evolution of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival - how one man’s vision for a holiday event grew to become the economic mainstay of the city of Ashland and a major force in American Theater.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Crater Lake Lodge was built in 1915 to attract more tourists. Photo circa 1920s. # 93200

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

William Gladstone Steel

William Gladstone Steel is considered to be the “Father of Crater Lake” and was instrumental in preserving the Cascade Range Reserve.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Sam Hill

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Sam Hill

Sam Hill had great dreams for the Pacific Northwest, and himself. Out of the hardscrabble, do-it-yourself communities of loggers, farmers and ranchers that typified 19th-century Oregon, Hill envisioned a new society built on progress and human ingenuity. He championed grand roadways, built monumental symbols for peace and dared to imagine a farming utopia on the Columbia River. His life was etched with hard fought triumphs and colossal failures, but his enduring devotion to progress made him one of the most important and legendary figures in Oregon’s history.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Murder On The Southern Pacific

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Murder On The Southern Pacific

“Murder on the Southern Pacific” chronicles Oregon’s most infamous train holdup, and examines the myths and mysteries still associated with the case. On October 11, 1923, three brothers tried to rob a Southern Pacific train as it made its way over the Siskiyou Summit of Southern Oregon. Before it was all over four men would be dead, and three brothers on the run. The incident would be the basis of movies, songs, comic books and even trading cards.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Miners and farmers formed the first American settlements throughout the Jefferson region. Roseburg, 1877

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

State of Jefferson

Anyone living in Southern Oregon or Northern California is probably also a resident of the State of Jefferson. Known as the “Mythical State of Jefferson” and “A State of Mind,” Jefferson is more of an idea than a place. It represents the spirit of the people who live in Southern Oregon and far Northern California.

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  • Researchers
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“Pittmon’s [Residential Security] Map of Portland, Ore. and vicinity, compiled from records on file in the offices of the city and county engineers.”  Copyright and published by Armena Pittmon, 1934, Portland.

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: History Pub

Portland’s Black Belt: Motives and Means in Albina Real Estate, 1940–1990

In 1960, Portland was the second-most segregated city on the West Coast, behind Los Angeles. Four of five Black residents lived in the Albina District. This presentation explores how the real estate industry, public officials, and citizens justified that spatial segregation. It traces the private- and public-sector mechanisms utilized to confine and re-shape Black settlement within Albina. A major motive for segregation was to enable financial exploitation of Black homeowners and renters, allowing housing-industry manipulators to extract wealth from the Black community.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Leo Adler. The Oregon Trail Regional Museum

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Leo Adler

The people of Baker City knew him as a successful businessman and his home town’s most active booster. But few realized just how successful “Mr. Baker” had been. This is a story of ambition and achievement and one ordinary man’s relationship with the small town he loved.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Wayne Morse

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Wayne Morse

Wayne Morse served four terms (1945 -1969) in the US Senate. He represented Oregon with brilliance and bravado and followed a vision of “principle above politics.” He could be quick to criticize, and he rankled many opponents. But he wrote and sponsored legislation that was well ahead of its time.

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Kennedy with nuns and students at Marycrest High School. May, 1960, Sister Edmund on right, photographer. CN 021687, bb008210

Type: Online Video, Lecture     

From Coos Bay to the White House: Candidate Kennedy in Oregon

In the years leading up to his presidential nomination in 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy was a frequent visitor to Oregon, serving as grand marshal of the Medford Pear Blossom Parade and throwing out the first ball at a Little League game in The Dalles. It was all a long way from Harvard, but it led to a crucial victory in the Oregon primary that propelled him toward the Oval Office.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers