Events

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Tom McCall

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Tom McCall

Tom McCall, Oregon’s chief executive from 1967 to 1975, may go down in history as the state’s most productive governor. He was certainly the most interesting. Nearly forty years after he left office and thirty years after his death, Oregon Governor Tom McCall remains one of the state’s most renowned political figures. He envisioned a quality of environment and life unique to Oregon, and he worked relentlessly to protect those values.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Lake view of the original Elizabethan theatre Photographer: Dwaine E. Smith. Courtesy of Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The origins and the evolution of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival - how one man’s vision for a holiday event grew to become the economic mainstay of the city of Ashland and a major force in American Theater.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
WWI “You Buy a Liberty Bond Lest I Perish” Statue of Liberty/war bonds poster. Designed by Charles Macaulay, 1917. Courtesy of the Mark Family Collection.

Type: Online Video, Lecture, Panel Discussion     Series: World War I Centennial

Citizenship and Civil Liberties on the World War I Home Front (Portland)

Americans fought their wars for democracy at home as well as abroad. Wartime propaganda and policies defined new rules for the status and practice of citizenship in Oregon and across the nation. Women activists, for example, claimed a more complete female citizenship. For women of color and women in ethnic communities, this push intersected with claims and contestations rooted in their racial and ethnic identities and pushed back against a system of white racism that seemed destined and determined to expand. Native Americans, African Americans, immigrants, and hosts of others all engaged in war-related debates and activism that furthered their ongoing claims to civic rights and obligations. Some saw the promise of citizenship through wartime loyalty in support of government programs and the war effort. Others claimed a citizen's right to dissent, often paying a high price to do so. This panel will provide audiences an overview of these histories and create opportunity for discussion about their ongoing legacies today.

  • Researchers
  • Family-friendly
“Pittmon’s [Residential Security] Map of Portland, Ore. and vicinity, compiled from records on file in the offices of the city and county engineers.”  Copyright and published by Armena Pittmon, 1934, Portland.

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: History Pub

Portland’s Black Belt: Motives and Means in Albina Real Estate, 1940–1990

In 1960, Portland was the second-most segregated city on the West Coast, behind Los Angeles. Four of five Black residents lived in the Albina District. This presentation explores how the real estate industry, public officials, and citizens justified that spatial segregation. It traces the private- and public-sector mechanisms utilized to confine and re-shape Black settlement within Albina. A major motive for segregation was to enable financial exploitation of Black homeowners and renters, allowing housing-industry manipulators to extract wealth from the Black community.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Kennedy with nuns and students at Marycrest High School. May, 1960, Sister Edmund on right, photographer. CN 021687, bb008210

Type: Online Video, Lecture     

From Coos Bay to the White House: Candidate Kennedy in Oregon

In the years leading up to his presidential nomination in 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy was a frequent visitor to Oregon, serving as grand marshal of the Medford Pear Blossom Parade and throwing out the first ball at a Little League game in The Dalles. It was all a long way from Harvard, but it led to a crucial victory in the Oregon primary that propelled him toward the Oval Office.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Ellis Hadley (First in line), William L. Finley (center), and Herman Bohlman (last) wading pantsless through water to photograph a red-tailed hawk’s in 1902 near Portland, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2652.

Type: Online Video, Slide Presentation     Series: On the Road with Finley and Bohlman

On the Road with Finley and Bohlman: Portland

Hunting Birds with a Camera: How William Finley and Herman Bohlman used photography to save Oregon's birds. The Oregon Historical Society is proud to present a retrospective on the work of early twentieth century nature photographers William L. Finley, Irene Finley, and Herman T. Bohlman. Scaling trees, fording rivers, and braving Oregon's most rugged landscapes, they went to almost any lengths to capture Oregon's birds on film. Their photographs and tireless dedication to education captivated the public and helped lead to the creation of the state's first wildlife refuges, laying the foundation for Oregon's legacy as a leader in conservation. Join us for a night of adventure and laughter as we explore the rarely seen, behind-the-scenes photographs and recapture the spirit of Finley's long beloved public programs.

  • Free
  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Okropong. Courtesy Obo Addy Legacy Project

Type: Online Video, Lecture, Musical Performance     Series: History Pub

The Legacy of Obo Addy and His Impact in the Pacific Northwest

For decades, the musical traditions of Ghana were explored and extended by Ghana-born and Portland-based drummer, composer, and bandleader Obo Addy. Together with his world beat band, Kukrudu, and traditional quartet, Okropong, Addy was one of Ghana's greatest musical ambassadors. Join us for a presentation on Obbo Addy's impact on the Pacific Northwest, including a performance by Okropong.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers
Rabbi Joshua Stampfer, the Rev. Dr. Rodney Page, and Mr. Frank Afranji

Type: Special Event, Panel Discussion, Online Video     

Oregonians’ Efforts for Peace in the Middle East

This evening of dialogue features perspectives and memories shared by three Oregonians — a Jew, a Muslim, and a Christian — who for almost three decades have been struggling together from their common faith, to work, pray, and strive for peace in the Middle East. Rabbi Joshua Stampfer, Mr. Frank Afranji, and the Rev. Dr. Rodney Page first traveled to Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza in 1988, during the first Intefada (uprising). They then founded the Oregon Inter-religious Committee for Peace in the Middle East. On New Year’s morning in 1990 they started Cavalcade for Peace in the Middle East just before the first Gulf war. The Cavalcade continued, on New Year’s morning, for many years. Join us for an evening of reflection on the ways they have worked together in Oregon and increase interfaith understanding and foster peace. Jan Elfers, new Executive Director of Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon, will moderate the panel. Questions will be taken from the audience.

  • Family-friendly
Theodore Roosevelt recreator Joe Wiegand. Photo by Mark Glenn Studio

Type: Lecture, Audio Recording     Series: Teddy Roosevelts Oregon Roadshow

An Evening with Teddy Roosevelt 2017

Back by popular demand, famed Teddy Roosevelt reprisor returns for a free performance at the First Congregational United Church of Christ. Watch as the Colonel comes to life at an exciting living history event, where you will be convinced you are in the presence of our twenty-sixth president.

  • Teachers
  • Family-friendly
Ernest Haycox and the Western

Type: Book Talk     

Ernest Haycox and the Western


Oregon Historical Society, Hatfield Room
1200 SW Park Ave
Portland, Oregon 97205

  • Free
  • Family-friendly