Events

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Children at Swan Island refugee center set up by the Red Cross after the Vanport Flood, 1948. OrHi 90661. Photographs: Portland - NE Neighborhoods - Vanport [graphic]; Photo file #1689-A; 1948/05

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Vanport

During the early 1940s, Vanport, Oregon, was the second largest city in the state. But on a Sunday afternoon in May 1948, it disappeared completely — destroyed by a catastrophic flood.

  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
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Umatilla Indians. Photograph by Andrews; Wesley (Charles Wesley); 1870-1950. bb015161 OrHi 41181

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Broken Treaties

Hundreds of books exist about the Lewis and Clark expedition and the decades of pioneers who followed them West. But even today, most Oregonians don't know much about the people who had settled here centuries before "the settlers" came. "Broken Treaties" introduces viewers to the tribes of our state and explores a thread of the Oregon story that hasn't been told very well over the years.

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Arline Moore and the Rev. Sherman Burgoyne, leaders of the League for Liberty & Justice in Hood River, look up at the

Type: Audio Recording     Series: History Pub

Stories of Resistance to Japanese American Incarceration and Discrimination

In recognition of the seventy-fifth anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, which sent 120,000 Japanese Americans to incarceration camps until after the conclusion of World War II, and the second annual Minoru Yasui Day, this program offers stories of those who stood against the incarceration and the racism faced by many Japanese Americans after the war. George Nakata grew up in Portland’s Nihonmachi and was incarcerated at Minidoka as a child. In his adulthood, Mr. Nakata has become a trusted story-teller, sharing many stories of incarceration from the community. Linda Tamura will highlight some of the Hood River, Oregon, residents who supported their Japanese American neighbors in the face of aggressive discrimination they faced after the war. We will read personal letters and proclamations from Oregonians to Governor Sprague in 1941 and 1942, both advocating for and resisting the exclusion and incarceration of Oregonian Japanese Americans.

  • Family-friendly
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WWI “Clear-The-Way!” Howard Chandler Christy war bond poster. (1918)

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: World War I Centennial

The U.S. Goes to the Great War: What Happened, Why It Matters Today

World War I marked a turning point in world and U.S. history that is far too little understood today. The United States’ formal declaration of war and entry into the Great War in April 1917 represented a seismic shift for the nation, which to that point, had attemped to avoid larger scale entanglements in European power politics and conflicts. One hundred years later we are in a position to recognize the epochal changes heralded by the First World War and the U.S.’s role in the conflict as well as its aftermath.

  • Researchers
  • Family-friendly
Bull Run Construction 001

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Bull Run

Few other cities in the world have water as pure and as well protected as Portland. For nearly 115 years, an ingenious, gravity-fed system has delivered mountain rainwater from an isolated river called the Bull Run. Yet the rich history of Portland’s water supply has unfolded largely unbeknownst to the people it serves.

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  • Researchers
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Civilian Conservation Corps

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Civilian Conservation Corps

2008 is the 75th anniversary of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Today its work is still enjoyed in parks and forests around the state. Through interviews with former enrollees, and historic film and pictures, the program tells the story of the CCC in Oregon.

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Marie Equi mugshot, an Oregonian convicted under the Espionage and Sedition Acts, San Quentin State Penitentiary, courtesy California State Archives

Type: Online Video, Lecture     Series: World War I Centennial

Dissent and World War I in the United States and Oregon

The Americans who opposed World War I built the largest, most diverse, and most sophisticated peace coalition up to that point in U.S. history. They came from a variety of backgrounds: wealthy and middle and working class, urban and rural, white and black, Christian and Jewish and atheist. They mounted street demonstrations and popular exhibitions, attracted prominent leaders from the labor and suffrage movements, ran peace candidates for local and federal office, and founded new organizations that endured beyond the cause. For almost three years, they helped prevent Congress from authorizing a massive increase in the size of the U.S. army—a step advocated by ex-president Theodore Roosevelt. Then many persevered, in the face of a concerted campaign by the government to silence them. Several anti-war activists founded the organization that became the ACLU to defend those whom the state prosecuted for refusing to change their minds. Soon after the end of the Great War, most Americans believed it had not been worth fighting. And when its bitter legacy led to the next world war, the warnings of these peace activists turned into a tragic prophecy—and the beginning of a surveillance state that still endures today.

  • Researchers
  • Family-friendly
Tom McCall

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

Tom McCall

Tom McCall, Oregon’s chief executive from 1967 to 1975, may go down in history as the state’s most productive governor. He was certainly the most interesting. Nearly forty years after he left office and thirty years after his death, Oregon Governor Tom McCall remains one of the state’s most renowned political figures. He envisioned a quality of environment and life unique to Oregon, and he worked relentlessly to protect those values.

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Lake view of the original Elizabethan theatre Photographer: Dwaine E. Smith. Courtesy of Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Type: Online Video     Series: Oregon Experience

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The origins and the evolution of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival - how one man’s vision for a holiday event grew to become the economic mainstay of the city of Ashland and a major force in American Theater.

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Vanport Mosaic Festival

Type: Film Showing, Special Event, Oral History, Partner Event     

Vanport Mosaic Festival

Multiple Locations
Portland, Oregon

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